Ancestry and Traditions: National Native American Heritage Month

November is National Native American Heritage Month—a country-wide celebration of the rich ancestry and traditions of Native Americans. Thrums Books joins the Smithsonian, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the National Gallery of Art, the National Park Service, and other organizations in paying tribute to Native peoples. We’ve been celebrating the ancestry and traditions of […]

Slow Fiber and an Act of Hope

Slow Fiber

Enjoy this beautiful post from our weaving friend Aaron Burmeister. I imagine you’ve heard or read about the Slow Fiber movement. Fiber enthusiast that you are, you’re likely even directly involved in some Slow Fiber cause. It and its similarly concerned older cousins, Slow Money and Slow Food, advocate for a different way of thinking […]

Language, Textiles, A Flash of the Human Spirit

At Tinkuy Gathering of the Textile Arts  in Cusco, Peru last fall, anthropologist Wade Davis, gave a remarkable keynote speech, “Geographies of Hope.” His talk was a celebration of the world’s indigenous cultures, but also he warned about the rapid disappearance of these cultures and the impact this has on the cultural web of life, […]

Branches and Blossoms on the Tree of Life

This week, we’re putting the finishing touches on a forthcoming book about Navajo weavers–one of two new books we’ll be bringing out this fall. One of  many memorable stories in the book is about a man who, suffering a terrible illness, commissioned for himself, a rug woven with the Tree of Life design. I’m not […]

Traditional Textile Creation and the Shrinking World

Joshua Hirschstein, co-author of Silk Weavers of Hill Tribe Laos, drops in this week to share his thoughts about the challenges to traditional textiles in a global economy. Minimizing the Impact In 2008, in a small village in the beautiful Annamite Mountains of northern Laos, Maren and I met a Tai Daeng silk weaver who […]

Textiles That Talk

A lot of textile books come my way: scholarly tomes, museum extravaganzas, technique how-tos, and much more. But I don’t think I’ve ever laid hands on a book quite like Maid, Mother, Crone and the Rabbit Net. First, there’s the time span. It starts in 525 CE, jumps to 1875, then to 1953 and present […]

Xam Tai’s Cultural Textile Tradition Marches into Modern Times

This week’s post is crafted by Joshua Hirschstein and Maren Beck, authors of our brand new book Silk Weaver’s of Hill Tribe Laos. They offer a special view into the world of Lao weaving and ask some hard questions about the future of traditional textiles. Thanks, Josh and Maren! Upon walking into a hill tribe […]

A Common Thread

ACommonThread

In our ongoing appreciation of museums and galleries around the world that celebrate all things textile, today we land in upper middle America to check in on the Textile Center—A national center for fiber art in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Textile Center has been honoring textile traditions for more than 20 years. It also promotes and encourages innovation […]

Silk Weavers of Hill Tribe Laos: The Journey

SilkWeaversLaos

Silk Weavers of Hill Tribe Laos authors Joshua Hirschstein and Maren Beck share some of the journey that led to writing the book. Enjoy! Maren and I never chose to be textile enthusiasts or authors, of Laos or anywhere else. Nor was this destiny inherited, or even anticipated. We kind of just . . . […]

  Afghanistan—Redefining Boundaries

Redefining Boundaries

In the opening chapter of their new book Embroidering within Boundaries–Afghan Women Creating a Future, Rangina Hamidi and Mary Littrell provide an honest depiction of the harsh realities of daily life for Afghan women. “As a woman with limited or no schooling and in a culture that prohibits women from appearing in public, the Afghan […]